Can Guinea Pigs Eat Asparagus?

Guinea pigs won hearts of many people across the globe, and they are now one of the most popular pets there is. Guinea pigs might not be as playful as cats and dogs, but are certainly plenty of positive sides to having a Guinea pig as your pet. They are calm animals with plenty of love for humans, especially if you show them that love in return.

They are pretty easy to maintain which is another reason why they are one of the more popular pets out there. In today’s text we are going to mention Asparagus and whether they are safe for Guinea pigs or not. This healthy vegetable is certainly recommended for people, but let us sees whether we can share our delicious bite with our furry friends or not.

Asparagus – Nutritive information

Asparagus is a plant from a lily family that grows in the wild, but it is also grown in the fields, so in many countries it is used as delicatessen vegetables. Because of its high nutritional value and poor calorie composition, asparagus is ideal for preparing light, healthy dishes during spring and summer. One cup of asparagus has only 43 calories, so this food is ideal if you want to reduce your diet and watch your weight.

It is a long-standing plant with a highly developed underground part and bright green or violet peaks, and is flourishes for 8-10 years. Although this culture is relatively little expanded in most countries, asparagus grows like a self-cultivated plant along the coastal area where it begins to flourish in March.

Pitomato asparagus is grown from annual grafts, which are transplanted from March or April. One plant, during the harvest from the third to the end of the sixth month, can give 12-15 shoots.

The difference between white and green asparagus is only in the way of breeding. Asparagus is covered with black polyethylene foil at a height of 10-20 cm in order to grow undisturbed. No sunburn creates a plant pigment (chlorophyll) and the shoots remain white. Unlike white, green asparagus is gentler, softer, and aromatic and has 2-3 times more vitamins.

According to the pyramid guidelines, the proper diet of asparagus is found in the group with other types of vegetables. For this group of foods, 3-5 servings are recommended daily. As a serving unit, 5 asparagus of medium size are taken, which is approximately 93 g.

Asparagus has a small energy content but a great nutritional value. The energy value of 100 g is only 84 kJ or 20 kcal, since the largest part is water (93%). Besides that asparagus contains 1.7% protein, 2.6% carbohydrate and 0.7% fat.

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Asparagus?

Giving asparagus to your Guinea pig is perfectly fine but in smaller amounts. This vegetable is certainly delicious and your furry friend is going to love nibbling on Asparagus, but the problem might be the price of this vegetable. They are pretty pricy because of the way they are grown and taken care of, so you should probably think of a cheaper treat you can give to your furry buddy.

Asparagus has a lot of vitamins and minerals that can boost your Guinea pig’s health and make him stronger and healthier. This is why it is a good idea to slip a few asparagus cubes into his diet every once in a while, but this is not something that is recommended don daily basis.

It is for the best to avoid giving your Guinea pig Asparagus all the time since that won’t be healthy for him. Even though they are rich in Vitamin C, which your buddy really needs, there are other ways you can give him Vitamin C without overdoing it with this vegetable. Too many asparagus can also cause vomiting, diarrhea and bloating, which is something you definitely don’t want. Your furry friend can’t tell you when enough is enough, so make sure you give him just a cube or two of asparagus every once in a while.

Their stomachs are very sensitive and every change to their diet should be handled with care. You shouldn’t add a large amount of new food to him feeding cup right away because his stomach might not react well to it. This is why it is for the best to give your Guinea pig a small amount of new food and then increase the amount later on if you notice that he is reacting well to it.

Asparagus have a very specific taste and smell, so there is no guarantee that your Guinea pig is going to adore them right away. If you notice that he is not loving them, there is no need to make him eat something he doesn’t’ like.

Just find another food rich in vitamin C and give him his daily dose of this precious vitamin, without making him eat Asparagus. This is the best way to make your Guinea pig healthy and safe, without sacrificing his happiness. Hay should be the primary food source for your small buddy, so make sure you include a lot of it into his everyday diet.

Recommended Diet and shelter

An ideal stay for a piglet is a cage filled with sawdust or husks. The hay is not good for the rug because it belongs to its diet (it can eat all the hay) and because in the bottom of the hay pack you can find small particles that the pig could breathe in and get severe problems with respiratory tract. So be careful when placing hay in a cage, put it with your fingers, not with your whole hand.

For Guinea pig, like for most herbivores, natural food is grass, and must be found on their menu every day. Almost everything is eaten from fruits and vegetables except tropical fruits. Some plants are poisonous by them, such as: lily of the valley, wild celery, cucumber; as well as plants that grow in the form of a reversed bell (in the form of a bulb): bark, onion, etc. Giving asparagus to your Guinea pig is perfectly fine but in smaller amounts. This vegetable is certainly delicious and your furry friend is going to love nibbling on Asparagus, but the problem might be the price of this vegetable.

Make sure that your pet regularly takes vitamin C. Like humans, sea pigs cannot synthesize their own vitamin C, and they must get it from food. It’s in fruits and vegetables (broccoli, apple, cabbage, cucumber, carrots, celery, peppers, spinach, shrimp, parsley, tomatoes), but can also be found in some granules. Due to insufficient intake of vitamin C, these sociable animals can suffer from scurvy and the consequences are fatal. So be sure to have at least one food containing this important vitamin each day.

Bathing is not necessary for Guinea pigs, although most people do that. It is more important that the sawdust changes regularly, but you can bathe it most often once a month if it is really necessary and it is a shampoo for rodents or shampoo for babies, being that the concentration of the shampoo is low.

Some tips on Guinea pig care

When you first bring him into your home, a piglet or a guinea pig will be scared and silent. Then you have to be very patient. Let him get used to the environment first. Put it, say, on the floor from which you will remove everything that could possibly be dangerous. It is a curious animal, so its study of the environment could take a while. Until it settles, that is, do not accustom, do not try to catch it or otherwise interfere with it, because they will be scared.

The moment you see that you walk freely on the floor or even comes to you, know that it is freed and then take a piece of a treat (essentially, it’s a piece of some fruit, but can also celery) and wait for your pet to come in and take it. It will still have a small amount of distrust and confusion (but it’s in an unknown environment), but you be patient. An ideal stay for a piglet is a cage filled with sawdust or husks.

The hay is not good for the rug because it belongs to its diet (it can eat all the hay) and because in the bottom of the hay pack you can find small particles that the pig could breathe in and get severe problems with respiratory tract. It will be a delicacy from afar, but after a while it will come to light because its curiosity must come to an end, especially because it loves sweet food more than anything. If he wants to eat from your hand, keep it for a while.

Otherwise, leave it a bit short, so give it to eat in your vicinity to get used to your presence.

Sea piglets must get used to holding in your hands. The problem with the people who own them, who complain that their pets are running regularly when they try to catch them, is that they are not used to it.

Gradually, and of course, patiently, your piglet will be able to hold your lap or shoulder whenever you like. You’ve already crossed the first step the moment he came to you. Now he needs attention and pampering. Place him on the back and tell him something in a gentle tone to remember your voice. Be calm. If it’s restless, keep it with caress, but do not be too hard to feel uncomfortable. Try to take it. Hold one hand with your stomach and the other with your hand. Put it on your lap and continue to pamper gently. Repeat the same action several times each day to get used to it. If he is busy trying to escape, he is scared, and let him go and wait for some time to calm down.